Tag Archives: New Porsche

New Porsche Boxster E Electric Vehicle Previewed

  • Porsche green news
  • Electric vehicles
  • Zero-emission Porsche Boxster E

2011 Electric Porsche Boxter E Front viewPorsche Boxster also experiences the way of a electric traction, which until a few years ago seemed almost a fiction, but today the cars with zero emissions are gaining in the sports segments and in the most famous brands.

While Porsche earlier announced the 918 RSR hybrid, the focus of that supercar concept is more of performance rather than practicality and efficiency. The Boxster E electric addresses this, with a sporty drive, yet long range.

The Porsche Boxster E has a 240-horsepower motor, and can go from 0 to 60 in 5.3 seconds. The EV is powered by a 29 kWh battery pack, which gives the car a 100-mile range before needing a recharge.

2011 Electric Porsche Boxter E Side viewPorsche is testing the Boxster E in Stuttgart, Germany, and plans to improve on the electric technology before commercial release. There are a total of three Boxster prototypes  and participating in the testing program for research on electric vehicles, built by the German Ministry of Transport.

The electric motor attaches to both front and rear axles for an all-wheel drive stability. Porsche says the car’s electronics are sourced from its parent company, Volkswagen.

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Porsche 911 GT2 RS Reaches North America – Video

  • Porsche news
  • Porsche 911 GT2 RS in America
  • GT2 RS development program

2011 Porsche GT2 RSLast month, the first twenty 911 GT2 RS customers had the opportunity to take delivery of their new cars at the El Toro Air Station in Irvine California.  Customers used the event to familiarize themselves with their new cars alongside Porsche Driving Instructors on the open airfield.  Andreas Preuninger, the Manager of High Performance Cars for Porsche, was also in attendance and used the event to disclose the secrets of the “Beast” GT2 RS development program.

Video from Porsche GT2 RS event at El Toro Air Station

Porsche boss Mueller in an interview with Automotive News Europe

  • Interview
  • Porsche in future
  • Porsche CEO Matthias Mueller
Matthias Mueller CEO of Porsche AG

Matthias Mueller CEO of Porsche AG

By 2018, Porsche CEO Matthias Mueller, 57, aims to boost annual global sales to more than 200,000 units, up from 97,000 in 2010. To do so, he will introduce at least one new Porsche every year. Mueller, a former executive at Volkswagen AG, replaced Michael Macht as Porsche AG CEO in October.

From 2003 to 2007, Mueller led VW subsidiary Audi’s product development, then coordinated VW Group’s overall product strategy.

Mueller spelled out Porsche’s challenges in an interview with Harald Hamprecht, editor-in-chief of Automotive News Europe.

What is your vision for Porsche in 2018?

Porsche is synonymous with sports cars–yesterday, today and tomorrow. In addition, in every other segment where we operate, such as with the Cayenne or Panamera, we always offer the sportiest vehicle. At the moment we are hard at work on our future strategy. And, I promise you, it will contain a few exciting surprises.

What are your most important objectives?

We want to remain the world’s most profitable car manufacturer and build on this position. We are going to raise the bar even higher in terms of customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and product quality.

What are the greatest challenges facing your product strategy?

We will improve coordination between our model line product life cycles. Each year we want to celebrate a major event, namely bring a new Porsche to market. We are also revising and improving existing products and looking to see what would bolster Porsche’s image in terms of healthy growth.

Can you reach the sales goal set by VW Group boss Martin Winterkorn of 150,000 units by 2015?

I think that if we do everything right we could even achieve that a bit earlier. Our objective is to have more than 200,000 units a year by 2018.

What are your goals for the next-generation 911 that you will bring to market this fall?

The new 911 will be the most successful of all time. Averaged over the life cycle, we want to sell 30,000 units a year. By way of comparison, in 2010 it was 20,000–at the end of the life cycle.

What are you going to introduce in 2012?

We will have the 911 Carrera in 2012 in its first full year of production. After this market introduction, we will also launch the entry-level models of the Boxster and the Cayman.

What new variants will there be in terms of body and drivetrain?

With the 911, we are up to 22 derivatives. We use this as an example for the other models.

What derivatives can we expect from the Panamera?

The Panamera has been on the market now for one and a half years. The product life cycle is typically about seven years. To mark the halfway point, we have planned a product upgrade. The car will be given an even more sporty look. I can imagine a long-wheelbase version, especially for growing markets such as China and Russia. We also think that a plug-in hybrid concept would fit well with the Panamera. And there are many more ideas out there, like a two-door Panamera that makes even more of a coupelike impression, and so on. We’re keeping all our options open. Currently, things are going so well with the Panamera that we’re not in any hurry.

What are your plans for 2014?

For 2014, I could imagine a legitimate successor to the Porsche 550–namely, a small midengine sports car. Actually, I couldn’t imagine a better name for a small roadster like that than the 550. But we’re just in the assessment phase.

And Porsche has taken on responsibility within the VW Group for developing the Mimo–namely, the midengine entry-level roadster?

Yes, we will develop the Cayman-Boxster line as the basis for other future sports cars.

What competitors do you see in that segment?

To be honest, very few. In another price bracket, there are models around such as the Mazda MX-5 with a segment share of just under 50 percent. We think that there is still a lot of room for Porsche and one VW sister model.

When will we see a supercar positioned above the 911–the so-called Porsche 929?

Theoretically, there is indeed still some space there. A 911 GT2 RS costs about 220,000 euros [$296,960]. The 918 Spyder will be significantly more than that. Between the two there is still a gap where Italian competitors are currently very active. We are investigating that as an in-house project. We will make a decision by the middle of the year.

When might you produce vehicles in China and the United States?

In the long term, the VW Group plans to sell between 10 million and 11 million cars a year. Production capacities are currently at 7 million to 8 million. To meet the required capacity in the VW Group, we certainly have to build five to six new plants worldwide. We should signal our own requirements in good time.

How will Porsche coordinate its product-development activities within the larger VW Group–especially with regard to Audi and Lamborghini?

We have taken over responsibility for developing the future sports car module. In addition, we are responsible for sporty sedans with rear- and all-wheel drive. And there are two other groupwide fields that we take care of: lightweight construction and engine expertise.

In an era of global warming, how do you intend to safeguard social acceptance of your products?

We are planning a hybrid concept in each model line. As already mentioned, we’re thinking about a plug-in hybrid variant of the Panamera. That would be the first of its kind in its premium sedan segment. With the 911, sportiness remains center stage. Thus we are planning a mild-hybrid variant [an automatic start-stop function] here at first.

When will we see a “pure” electric Porsche?

Should it become apparent by 2020 that 20 percent of all new cars will already be electrically driven, then you can take it that Porsche will also be challenging for 20 percent of its sales with electric vehicles. But I’m betting on a total EV share closer to 3 percent to 5 percent by 2020. We are now almost over the initial hype before the business really gets started.

What is Porsche’s global sales target in 2011?

The minimum target we have set ourselves for 2011 is to beat the previous year’s performance of 97,000 sales. We want to reach the 100,000-vehicle mark.

What are your greatest short-term challenges?

We are bringing the next generation of the 911 to market in autumn 2011. In the meantime, we will get the phasing out of the current generation exactly right. In parallel with that, we are working on the technical concept of the 918 Spyder and Cajun.

Will the 911 be a sales leader?

No, that’s not achievable because the segment is simply not as big as an SUV or sedan segment. What is far more important to us is that we remain the market and segment leader.

Last year, the United States was your largest single market, followed by China and Germany. Will China overtake the United States as your largest market?

I am assuming that our ranking will change. It is likely that in the short term China will become our largest market worldwide, thereby supplanting the United States. But the United States will remain one of our most important markets, which we are doing a great deal to cultivate.

How many luxury brands will disappear from the market by 2018?

Everyone is anticipating brand consolidation in the car market. When I look around there are new small brands popping up like mushrooms all the time. A number of established brands will certainly not have an easy time of it in future. You really don’t have to worry about Porsche. We are one of the very few manufacturers that can combine a high degree of exclusivity with commercial success.

New Porsche 550 Spyder could arrive in 2014

  • Porsche news
  • Roadster Porsche 550 Spyder
Porsche 550 Spyder

Porsche 550 Spyder

Fans have been eagerly waiting for Porsche to receive a version of the small midengine roadster concept that Volkswagen introduced in 2009
Nothing was ever confirmed but it now appears that the proposed car will soon enter production, according to a recent interview by Automotive News Europe with Porsche CEO Matthias Müller. Muller has already picked out a name: 550. For those who may not be familiar, the Porsche 550 Spyder is one of the brand’s seminal
Inspiration and the design philosophy behind the new Spyder, comes from the first Porsche 550 Spyder, unveiled at the 1953 Paris Motor Show. The compact two-seater was originally designed for racing and took a famous class-victory at Le Mans. But the notoriously tricky-to-handle roadster cemented its place in history when the Hollywood legend James Dean died at the wheel of one in 1955.

Detroit 2009 Volkswagen Bluesport

Detroit 2009 Volkswagen Bluesport

At the 2009 Detroit auto show, Volkswagen showed off its diesel-powered Concept Bluesport roadster and this led to talk that the VW Group is developing a new car. In the ANE interview, Muller gave hints that the project is still on the table and could arrive in 2014. He could imagine a “legitimate successor to the Porsche 550 — namely, a small midengine sports car.” He also said that the project is still in the assessment phase. With regards to the name, he said that he can’t imagine a better name for this small roadster than the 550. But then pricing would be an issue as any model that Porsche may develop under the Boxster/Cayman would be dicey since a Porsche version of the car has to be a premium offering. But then again, Porsche aims to sell up to 200,000 vehicles by 2018 so the prospects of a small, Porsche-badged roadster with an engine in the middle seem to be bright. [via autonews – sub. required]

New 2012 Porsche 911 cabrio (project 991)

  • Porsche news
  • New Porsche 911 cabrio (project 991)
  • New 2012 Porsche 911 spy shots

2012 Porsche 911 (991) cabriolet spy shotsPorsche is now less than a year away from launching its next-generation Porsche 911 and as can be seen by these latest spy shots, prototypes for the car appear to be almost complete. Earlier this year we brought you spy shots of the latest prototype for the 911 Carrera hard-top, and today we have new shots of the 2012 Porsche 911 Cabriolet.

We first started seeing test-mules for the new Porsche 911 back in 2008 and soon after that Porsche’s chief of research and development, Wolfgang Dürheimer, revealed some details of what to expect for the new car.

Speaking of the new car, Dürheimer said, “‘it will be even more competent, even sexier, even more unique. The design can of course only be evolutionary, but beneath the skin, almost anything is possible”. The 2012 Porsche 911, known internally as ‘project 991’, will feature a few radical departures from the 911’s long-running classical styling.

The changes are out of necessity more than anything, but they will be noticeable. First, pedestrian protection rules in Europe will require a change to the nose section of the car, likely meaning a larger and more collapsible bumper section. The rear of the car will also be changed, but for aerodynamic improvement.

Clear differences between the new model and the current 997 are the more upright headlights, a slightly longer body, and the side mirrors are now positioned at the side of the doors and not at the window.

Other new features for the car will include extensive use of lightweight carbon fiber materials and active aerodynamics–surfaces that react to what the car is doing, and how fast it’s doing it. Expect adjustable front and rear spoilers, dynamically opening and closing air intakes and an automatic rear wing.

As for powertrains, reports coming out of Germany claim power in the base Carrera will stand at 345 horsepower from a 3.4-liter boxer engine, downsized 200 ccs from the current engine. Step up to the Carrera S, however, and you’re expected to get a bigger 3.8-liter engine and 395 horsepower.

We still have a long wait to get the final word, however, as the 2012 Porsche 911 isn’t due until September’s 2011 Frankfurt Auto.

[motorauthority.com]

New 2012 Porsche 911 (project 991) spy shots

  • Porsche news
  • New Porsche 911 (project 991)
  • New 2012 Porsche 911 spy shots

2012 Porsche 911 (991) Spy ShotsPorsche is soon to launch its next-generation Porsche 911 and as can be seen by these latest spy shots, prototypes for the car appear to be almost complete. Shown in the least camouflage and from the closest distance yet, the new Porsche 911 looks to be just as its predecessors have been: a variation on the classic theme, with some modern tweaks. But just as the continuity of looks in previous cars have masked major mechanical changes, so to will the next-gen Porsche 911.
We first started seeing test-mules for the 2012 Porsche 911 back in 2008 and soon after Porsche’s former chief of research and development, Wolfgang Dürheimer, revealed some details of what to expect for the new car.
Speaking of the new car, Dürheimer said, “‘it will be even more competent, even sexier, even more unique. The design can of course only be evolutionary, but beneath the skin, almost anything is possible”. The 2012 Porsche 911, known internally as ‘project 991’, will feature a few radical departures from the 911’s long-running classical styling.
The changes are out of necessity more than anything, but they will be noticeable. First, pedestrian protection rules in Europe will require a change to the nose section of the car, likely meaning a larger and more collapsible bumper section. The rear of the car will also be changed, but for aerodynamic improvement.
Clear differences between the new model and the current 997 are the more upright headlights, a slightly longer body, and the side mirrors are now positioned at the side of the doors and not at the window.

Other new features for the car will include extensive use of lightweight carbon fiber materials and active aerodynamics–surfaces that react to what the car is doing, and how fast it’s doing it. Expect adjustable front and rear spoilers, dynamically opening and closing air intakes and an automatic rear wing.

As for powertrains, reports coming out of Germany claim power in the base Carrera will stand at 345 horsepower from a 3.4-liter boxer engine, downsized 200 ccs from the current engine. Step up to the Carrera S, however, and you’re expected to get a bigger 3.8-liter engine and 395 horsepower.

We still have a long wait to get the final word, however, as the 2012 Porsche 911 isn’t due until September’s 2011 Frankfurt Auto Show.

[motorauthority.com]

2012 Porsche 911 (991) Winter Testing In Sweden – Video

2012 Porsche 911 (991) Carrera’s caught in Los Angeles – Video

New 2012 Porsche 911 (Project991) Spy Shots


New Porsche Boxster Spy Shots

  • Porsche news
  • New Porsche Boxster
  • Porsche spy shots

2013 Porsche Boxster Spy ShotsWith the arrival of the new Boxster S Black Edition in showrooms this year, Porsche’s entry-level convertible range is now complete and due to be replaced by a brand new model in the coming 12 months. These latest spy shots reveal a nearly complete prototype, which surprisingly was spotted at BMW’s test facility in Munich.
Development of the next-generation 2012 Porsche Boxster is well underway as the images and video of the prototype demonstrate. However, a rumor alleging that Porsche insiders are talking about a lightweight, turbocharged four-cylinder platform for the next-gen Boxster recently began making the rounds.

As you probably expect, in terms of design, the future 2012 Porsche Boxster will be pretty much similar to the current version, with only various changes. The 2012 Porsche Boxster will get LED rear lights, a re-designed boot lid and probably a new rear bumper. The central exhaust will also be carried on to the future 2012 Porsche Boxster

The thought coincides with possible rumors of a revived 914 that could be co-branded by both VW and Porsche, which means the new Boxster could certainly be fitted with a highly charged four-banger. If that’s the case, we’re sure Porsche will still offer a six-cylinder option for upper range models.

Such a design premise might offer more room to launch a smaller engine in the next-generation 911 also aimed at improving emissions ratings. In fact, reports out of Germany suggest that Porsche will be going with a ‘downsized’ 3.4-liter flat-six for the base 911 Carrera.

After all, even the current six-cylinder Boxster and Cayman, the most efficient in Porsche’s line, emit about 222 g/km of CO2–about 100 g/km more than the projected 2015 limits.

Whatever Porsche has in store for the new car, we’ll have to wait until its expected arrival late this year or early next to find out.

[motorauthority.com]

2012 Porsche Boxster Spy Shots